Do you own any Naruto video games?





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  Number of votes: 196  
  Started: 04-22-2010  
on May 9, 2010 at 00:59

numbah_1_stunna
Japanese Schools
Japanese schools up to Junior High School are almost exclusively public (less than 5% are privately owned and run). Until Junior High School, students study at the school in whose catchment area their home is located. However, senior high schools have overlapping catchment areas: this means that there is competition among schools for the best pupils in a particular area, and among pupils for places at the best schools. Over one-quarter of senior high schools are private, indicating the extent of the competition in the higher levels Japanese schooling: parents will pay substantial amounts for their children's educations.

While the general improvement of education and standard of living for the Japanese population as a whole has resulted in some of the highest standards of education in the world, some claim that the attendant stresses have lead to an increase in psychological problems among children (although we are not aware of any published figures to support this). Also, the improved diet of many Japanese, coupled with a reduction in child labour (traditionally assisting relatives on farms or smallholdings in rural areas) and changes in social habits has lead to an increase in obesity amongst Japanese schoolchildren. However, this phenomenon is well-known in most developed countries, not just in Japan, and seems less pronounced than in the West.

For some time it has been accepted that a Japanese student's life is largely decided by the their university entrance exam: that is, entrance to the right university can lead to a well-paid job with one of the larger Japanese companies. However, increasing competition amongst schools means that this pressure is extending further back and many now claim that a person's future is largely decided by the age of twelve or fifteen with entry to the right junior high school. Wht effect the current economic recession and restructuring will have on this system remains to be seen.

Kindergarten (Yochien)
Although optional education, in 2000 the number of new entrants to kindergarten was over 63% of the number of new entrants to Primary or Junior School - indicating that well over half of all Japanese children start their education earlier than required by the state. The Japanese government aims to increase the availability of kindergartens, in part to allow mothers to work if they need or want to. The trend to earlier and earlier education is increasing with special subjects for kindergarten students including English. However, the fact that the number of children graduating from kindergarten and from junior school has declined by one-quarter over the past ten years indicates the scale of the demographic challenge facing Japan in the near future.

Elementary School (Shogakkou)
For six years from age six to twelve, this is the first stage of compulsory education for Japanese children. Almost all Japanese children enter at this stage, although an increasing number have already experi
on May 9, 2010 at 00:59

-Ryo-
Quote by -Copy-This-!!
Lol.
on May 9, 2010 at 00:59
on May 9, 2010 at 00:59

numbah_1_stunna
Junior High School (Chugakkou)
From twelve to fifteen years old, this is a hugely important phase in the upbringing of the Japanese child. Results at Junior High School can determine entry to a good Senior High School and hence to a good university and career. At this point children usually stay late at school, busy with various clubs and activities as well as studies at a Juku (see below).

Senior High School (Koukou; koutougakkou)
The peak of pressure for the student in the Japanese school system from 15 to 18 years old, entry to senior high school is by an entrance exam. Preparation for the exam itself, of course, is usually through attending a good Juku (see below). To get a place at the best university means that a student really needs to go to the right senior high school, so the entrance exam can have a major impact on the future career of Japanese students. As the number of private schools increases (at present over one-quarter of senior high schools are private) and pressure to perform well increases, education ends up costing parents more and more. This pressure is slowly diffusing down the chain as entry to the best senior high schools is increasingly affected by the junior high school attended. Although not compulsory in Japan, over 90% of all children attend Senior High School.

Part-time Senior High school
In some cases, where students are already working full time, they may attend evening school instead of normal high school. These classes are run in the evening, and instead of the usual three years, it takes four years to complete a senior high school education. Classes usually run until after 9pm or later, so this makes for a busy lifestyle for the working student. Compared to the average senior high school student, students at part-time high school tend to be far more socially mature and attentive students - also perhaps as attending a night school is generally a voluntary action and commitment is needed to complete the program, whereas attending Senior High School is often a matter of parental pressure.

Juku (Cram schools)
The pressure of the education system in Japan is great, and so much of a child's future depends on going to the right school and university that from a very young age (in some cases from before ten years old) a child's school day does not end with the school bell. After the piano or violin lessons, the basketball or football, kendo or judo, archery or English, Maths or Art or any of the dozens of other clubs that are organised at school most children also attend cram schools called "Juku". These have extra lessons, which may be used to push bright students further or to help others catch up to the crowd. The classes may run until late, and a 12-hour day is not unusual for the Japanese high school student (before homework).

While this system has produced one of the most impressive levels of literacy and highest standards education in the world, there are those who now question the impact of s
on May 9, 2010 at 01:02

***HuGz***
wow nigga yo ass is lame.
on May 9, 2010 at 01:03

-Ryo-
How annoying.
on May 9, 2010 at 01:04

-Ryo-
Quote by numbah_1_stunna
stop lying...
I am 15...
on May 9, 2010 at 01:05

numbah_1_stunna
Quote by -Ryo-
I am 15...
no i meant about school......
on May 9, 2010 at 01:06

***HuGz***
Quote by numbah_1_stunna
no i meant about school......
mind your own business bioch.
on May 9, 2010 at 01:07

-Ryo-
Quote by numbah_1_stunna
no i meant about school......
I don't even think you read that whole thing yourself did you?
on May 9, 2010 at 01:08

numbah_1_stunna
Quote by -Ryo-
I don't even think you read that whole thing yourself did you?
i skimmed thru it but it said dey get dun wit school at 18
on May 9, 2010 at 01:08

xIxI
oh ... srry ... back ^^'
on May 9, 2010 at 01:09

***HuGz***
Quote by xIxI
oh ... srry ... back ^^'
hi!!!!
on May 9, 2010 at 01:10

-Ryo-
Quote by numbah_1_stunna
i skimmed thru it but it said dey get dun wit school at 18
It also saidmost kids in japan are starting school early but that's not why I'm out at age 15..
on May 9, 2010 at 01:12
on May 9, 2010 at 01:13

xIxI
Quote by -Ryo-
It also saidmost kids in japan are starting school early but that's not why I'm out at age 15..
D: it's cause ur smart...
on May 9, 2010 at 01:13

xIxI
Quote by ***HuGz***
hi!!!!
ihola! ...sorry... i has to go now
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